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2018
<<   April   >>

Beginning The main stage New stage
April 20, FR
Evening:   Un Ballo in Maschera (Opera by Giuseppe Verdi)   Performance information
Un Ballo in Maschera (Opera by Giuseppe Verdi) - Bolshoi Theatre

Opera in three acts
Giuseppe Verdi
Libretto by Antonio Somma based on the text by Augustin Eug?ne Scribe
Music Director: Giacomo Sagripanti
Director and Set Designer: Davide Livermore
Costume Designer: Mariana Fracasso
Lightning Designer: Antonio Castro
Chief Chorus Master: Valery Borisov
Video Design: D-wok
Will be premiered on April 20, 2018.

Evening:   Coppelia (Ballet by Leo Delibes)   Performance information
Coppelia (Ballet by Leo Delibes) - Bolshoi Theatre

Ballet in three acts
Libretto by Charles Nuitter and Arthur Saint-Leon after the stories by Ernst Theodore Amadeus Hoffmann
Choreography: Marius Petipa and Enrico Cecchetti
Revival and new choreographic version: Sergei Vikharev
Designer: Boris Kaminsky
Costume Designer: Tatiana Noginova
Music Director: Igor Dronov
Lighting Designer: Damir Ismagilov

SYNOPSIS

Act I
A public Square in a small town, on the borders of Galicia, with wooden houses painted with bright colors. One house stands out in contrast to the others, with grating before the windows and the door securely fastened. This is the residence of Coppelius.
Swanilda is approaching the house of Coppelius, raises her eyes to a large window, behind which Coppelia, the daughter of old Coppelius, is seen, sitting with a book in her hands apparently absorbed in her reading. Every morning she is seen at the same window and in the same attitude, and then disappears. She never goes out from this mysterious residence. She appears to be pretty, and many young men in the town have passed long hours beneath her window, beseeching for one look.
Swanilda suspects that her fiance, Frantz, is not indifferent to the beauty of Coppelia. She tries to attract her attention, but Coppelia has her eyes always fixed on her book, of which she does not even turn the leaves.
Swanilda cannot contain her feelings of anger. She starts to knock at the door, but she perceives Frantz approaching, and remains in hiding to see what he is going to do.
Frantz, who at first was going toward Swanilda house, suddenly stops. Coppelia is at the window. He bows to her. At the same time she turns her head and appears to return Frantz s salute. Frantz has scarcely time to throw a kiss to Coppelia before old Coppelius has opened his window, and seems to be amused at what has been going on.
Swanilda is furious against Coppelius and against Frantz. However, she remains quiet and pretends to have seen nothing. She runs after a butterfly. Frantz runs with her, and catching it, pins it in the collar of his coat. Swanilda reproaches him for his cruelty: "What has this poor insect done to you?" After many reproaches, the young maid brings herself to tell him, that she knows all. He has deceived her. He loves Coppelia. Frantz tries in vain to defend himself.
The Burgomaster announces that on the next day a grand fete will take place - the Lord of the manor has given a bell to the Town. They crowd round the Burgomaster. The noise is being made in Coppelius house. Odd looking lights are shining at the windows. Some of the girls shrink with fear from this mysterious abode. But it is nothing but the clash of the hammer on the anvil, and the light is the reflection from the forge. Coppelius is an old fool who is always working. At what? No one knows and who cares? He must be left alone and not be stopped from amusing himself. The Burgomaster approaches Swanilda. He tells her that tomorrow the lord of the manor will give a dowry and marriage to several couples. She is betrothed to Frantz; shall they not be united to-morrow? Ah! but there is time yet, and the young girl looking spitefully at Frantz, tells the Burgomaster that she will tell him a story. It is the story of a straw which reveals all secrets.
Swanilda takes the straw from a bundle, and placing it to her ear, pretends to listen; then she tells Frantz to listen also. Does it not tell him that he does not love Swanilda? Frantz answers that he hears nothing. Swanilda tries it with one of Frantz s friends, who pretends to hear very distinctly what the straw says. Frantz tries to protest, but Swanilda breaking the straw before his eyes, tells him that everything is broken between them. Frantz goes away, while Swanilda dances in the midst of her companions. Glasses are placed on the tables, and they drink the health of the lord of the manor and the Burgomaster.
Coppelius leaves his house and securely fastens the door. He has not gone many steps, before he is surrounded by a crowd of young fellows; some of whom want to take him away with them, while the others want to make him dance. The old man goes off swearing.
Swanilda is bidding adieu to her friends, when one of them sees a key, which Coppelius must have dropped.
The girls suggest to Swanilda to visit the mysterious house. At first Swanilda hesitates, but she wants to meet this rival. "Well, then, let us enter, " she says. The girls enter the house of Coppelius.
Frantz is seen coming up, carrying a ladder. He has determined to see what chance he has with Coppelia. The opportunity is most favorable and Coppelius is far off! But it is not so, for just as Frantz is steadying the ladder against the balcony, he sees Coppelius returning and looking for the lost key. He sees Frantz just about to climb the ladder. Frantz runs away.

Act II
A large room is full of all kinds of instruments and tools. There are several automata on pedestals. There are figures of an old man, dressed in Persian costume, a Negro in threatening attitude, a little Moorish cymbal-player, a Chinaman with a tympanon before him.
The girls cautiously enter Coppelius house. Who are those people standing still in the dark shadows? They are face to face with the strange figures which a moment before had so frightened them. Swanilda draws aside the heavy curtains. There she sees Coppelia seated with her book in her hand. Swanilda salutes the strange girl who remains motionless. She speaks to her, but gets no answer. She touches the young girl s arm and then starts back through fear. Can it be a living creature? She puts her hand to the heart, but it does not beat. This young lady is an automaton, and the handy-work of Coppelius! Swanilda doesn t worry herself any more about her rival, but looks forward to the fun of telling Frantz all about her discovery. The girls run laughing, around the studio. They have nothing to fear now.
One of them in passing by the Tympanon player, touches it by accident. It begins playing a tune. The girls are at first bewildered, but soon begin dancing. They then find the spring, which sets the little Moorish figure in motion.
Suddenly Coppelius returns in a furious rage. He draws together the curtains which conceal Coppelia; stops the automata and runs after the girls. They slip through his hands and disappear down the back stairs. Swanilda is hiding behind the curtains. She is caught! but no; crouching in a corner she remains unseen when Coppelius looks behind the curtain. He examines Coppelia and finds that no harm has been done. He breathes more freely.
But what is that noise? He sees the top of a ladder in the window and then Frantz appears. Coppelius does not show himself. Frantz is going toward the spot where he has seen Coppelia, when two stout hands seize him. Frantz nearly dead with fright, implores Coppelius to forgive him. He tries to escape, but the old man holds him tightly. "What are you up to here?" he asks. Frantz confesses that he is in love. "I am not so bad as people say. Sit down and let us take a drink together and have a chat, " answers Coppelius. He gets an old flagon of wine and two goblets. He takes a sip with Frantz, and then, when Frantz is not looking, he throws away the wine.
Frantz finds that the wine has a peculiar taste. He tosses it down, however, and Coppelius makes him drink more and more. Frantz tries to get near the window where he has seen Coppelia. But his legs give way, he falls heavily on the bench and is asleep.
Coppelius gets a magic book and studies its pages. Then he rolls the pedestal which holds Coppelia, bringing it nearer to sleeping Frantz. Placing his hands over the heart and forehead of the young man, he tries to take away his soul to give life to the young girl. Coppelia rises up, she begins her mechanical motions but then she descends the first step of the pedestal and then the second. She walks! She lives!
Coppelius is almost beside himself with joy. His work has surpassed all that human hand has ever created! She soon begins to dance slowly, and than all at once darts off so quickly that Coppelius can scarcely follow her. She smiles; a color comes to her cheeks and she is full of life!
She sees the vial and places it to her lips. Coppelius is just in time to snatch the flagon from her hands. She perceives the magic book and asks Coppelius what it means. "There are impenetrable secrets, " he answers, and closes the book. She examines the automata. "I have made them all, " Coppelius says. She stops in front of Frantz. "And that one?" she asks. "It is like the rest, " he answers. She sees a dagger and pricks her own finger with the point of it and then amuses herself by thrusting it at the little Moor. Coppelius roars with laughter... but she approaches Frantz... The old man stops her and she turns against him and chases him around the studio. At last he disarms her. He throws a cloak over her shoulders, and it seems to awaken in her a world of new ideas. She dances a Spanish dance. Then she finds a Scotch scarf-pin and taking it in her hands, she dances a jig. She jumps and runs around, throwing everything within her reach to the ground and breaking it! She is decidedly too lively! What shall Coppelius do!
In the midst of all the noise, Frantz wakes up. Coppelius now seizes Coppelia and replacing her by main force on the pedestal, draws the curtains. He then goes up to Frantz and orders him to leave. "Go along!" he cries, "you are good for nothing."
Then he stops and listens. Did he not hear the tune which generally accompanies the movement of the automata? He jumps up and while he is staring at Coppelia, who has started her old movements, Swanilda skips out unobserved from behind the curtain. She sets the other two automata going. "Are these two also moving by themselves?" Coppelius exclaims. All at once he sees Swanilda disappearing with Frantz. He has a vague notion that some game has been played on him and falls heavily in the midst of the automata which keep moving as if to mock at their master s grief and despair.

Act III
A lawn in front of the baronial castle. At the back, the bell, the gift of the lord of the manor, is hung from poles, decorated with garlands and banners. A car covered with allegorical designs and on which are grouped the various actors for the fete, has just stopped in front of the bell.
The priests have pronounced a benediction over the bell. The betrothed couples who are to be given a dowry, and are to be united on this festal day go and bow before the baron. Frantz and Swanilda complete their mutual reconciliation. Frantz has disabused himself of his temporary infatuation and thinks no more of Coppelia. He knows what a joke has been played upon him. Swanilda forgives him and giving him her hand, advances with him before the lord of the manor.
All at once there is a stir among the crowd. Coppelius comes to implore and even to demand justice; they have ridiculed him and have broken everything in his house, his masterpieces made with the greatest labor and patience, have been smashed. Who is going to pay him? Swanilda, who has just received her dowry, quickly offers it to Coppelius. But the lord of the manor stops Swanilda. She may keep her dowry. He throws a purse to him and whilst Coppelius departs with his money, he gives the signal for the festivities to begin.
The Bell-ringer alights first from the car. He summons the Morning Hours. They appear, quickly followed by Aurora. The bell rings! It is the Hour of Prayer. Aurora vanishes, chased by the Hours of Day. These are the working hours, and the young girls and reapers begin their work. The bell rings again! It announces a wedding.
Derived from: Delibes Ballet of Coppelia. Paris Opera Libretto. Under the Direction of Mr. Heinrich Conried. The Original Italian, French or German Libretto with a Correct English Translation. New York : F. Rullman.

Video
April 21, SA
Matinée:   Coppelia (Ballet by Leo Delibes)   Performance information
Coppelia (Ballet by Leo Delibes) - Bolshoi Theatre

Ballet in three acts
Libretto by Charles Nuitter and Arthur Saint-Leon after the stories by Ernst Theodore Amadeus Hoffmann
Choreography: Marius Petipa and Enrico Cecchetti
Revival and new choreographic version: Sergei Vikharev
Designer: Boris Kaminsky
Costume Designer: Tatiana Noginova
Music Director: Igor Dronov
Lighting Designer: Damir Ismagilov

SYNOPSIS

Act I
A public Square in a small town, on the borders of Galicia, with wooden houses painted with bright colors. One house stands out in contrast to the others, with grating before the windows and the door securely fastened. This is the residence of Coppelius.
Swanilda is approaching the house of Coppelius, raises her eyes to a large window, behind which Coppelia, the daughter of old Coppelius, is seen, sitting with a book in her hands apparently absorbed in her reading. Every morning she is seen at the same window and in the same attitude, and then disappears. She never goes out from this mysterious residence. She appears to be pretty, and many young men in the town have passed long hours beneath her window, beseeching for one look.
Swanilda suspects that her fiance, Frantz, is not indifferent to the beauty of Coppelia. She tries to attract her attention, but Coppelia has her eyes always fixed on her book, of which she does not even turn the leaves.
Swanilda cannot contain her feelings of anger. She starts to knock at the door, but she perceives Frantz approaching, and remains in hiding to see what he is going to do.
Frantz, who at first was going toward Swanilda house, suddenly stops. Coppelia is at the window. He bows to her. At the same time she turns her head and appears to return Frantz s salute. Frantz has scarcely time to throw a kiss to Coppelia before old Coppelius has opened his window, and seems to be amused at what has been going on.
Swanilda is furious against Coppelius and against Frantz. However, she remains quiet and pretends to have seen nothing. She runs after a butterfly. Frantz runs with her, and catching it, pins it in the collar of his coat. Swanilda reproaches him for his cruelty: "What has this poor insect done to you?" After many reproaches, the young maid brings herself to tell him, that she knows all. He has deceived her. He loves Coppelia. Frantz tries in vain to defend himself.
The Burgomaster announces that on the next day a grand fete will take place - the Lord of the manor has given a bell to the Town. They crowd round the Burgomaster. The noise is being made in Coppelius house. Odd looking lights are shining at the windows. Some of the girls shrink with fear from this mysterious abode. But it is nothing but the clash of the hammer on the anvil, and the light is the reflection from the forge. Coppelius is an old fool who is always working. At what? No one knows and who cares? He must be left alone and not be stopped from amusing himself. The Burgomaster approaches Swanilda. He tells her that tomorrow the lord of the manor will give a dowry and marriage to several couples. She is betrothed to Frantz; shall they not be united to-morrow? Ah! but there is time yet, and the young girl looking spitefully at Frantz, tells the Burgomaster that she will tell him a story. It is the story of a straw which reveals all secrets.
Swanilda takes the straw from a bundle, and placing it to her ear, pretends to listen; then she tells Frantz to listen also. Does it not tell him that he does not love Swanilda? Frantz answers that he hears nothing. Swanilda tries it with one of Frantz s friends, who pretends to hear very distinctly what the straw says. Frantz tries to protest, but Swanilda breaking the straw before his eyes, tells him that everything is broken between them. Frantz goes away, while Swanilda dances in the midst of her companions. Glasses are placed on the tables, and they drink the health of the lord of the manor and the Burgomaster.
Coppelius leaves his house and securely fastens the door. He has not gone many steps, before he is surrounded by a crowd of young fellows; some of whom want to take him away with them, while the others want to make him dance. The old man goes off swearing.
Swanilda is bidding adieu to her friends, when one of them sees a key, which Coppelius must have dropped.
The girls suggest to Swanilda to visit the mysterious house. At first Swanilda hesitates, but she wants to meet this rival. "Well, then, let us enter, " she says. The girls enter the house of Coppelius.
Frantz is seen coming up, carrying a ladder. He has determined to see what chance he has with Coppelia. The opportunity is most favorable and Coppelius is far off! But it is not so, for just as Frantz is steadying the ladder against the balcony, he sees Coppelius returning and looking for the lost key. He sees Frantz just about to climb the ladder. Frantz runs away.

Act II
A large room is full of all kinds of instruments and tools. There are several automata on pedestals. There are figures of an old man, dressed in Persian costume, a Negro in threatening attitude, a little Moorish cymbal-player, a Chinaman with a tympanon before him.
The girls cautiously enter Coppelius house. Who are those people standing still in the dark shadows? They are face to face with the strange figures which a moment before had so frightened them. Swanilda draws aside the heavy curtains. There she sees Coppelia seated with her book in her hand. Swanilda salutes the strange girl who remains motionless. She speaks to her, but gets no answer. She touches the young girl s arm and then starts back through fear. Can it be a living creature? She puts her hand to the heart, but it does not beat. This young lady is an automaton, and the handy-work of Coppelius! Swanilda doesn t worry herself any more about her rival, but looks forward to the fun of telling Frantz all about her discovery. The girls run laughing, around the studio. They have nothing to fear now.
One of them in passing by the Tympanon player, touches it by accident. It begins playing a tune. The girls are at first bewildered, but soon begin dancing. They then find the spring, which sets the little Moorish figure in motion.
Suddenly Coppelius returns in a furious rage. He draws together the curtains which conceal Coppelia; stops the automata and runs after the girls. They slip through his hands and disappear down the back stairs. Swanilda is hiding behind the curtains. She is caught! but no; crouching in a corner she remains unseen when Coppelius looks behind the curtain. He examines Coppelia and finds that no harm has been done. He breathes more freely.
But what is that noise? He sees the top of a ladder in the window and then Frantz appears. Coppelius does not show himself. Frantz is going toward the spot where he has seen Coppelia, when two stout hands seize him. Frantz nearly dead with fright, implores Coppelius to forgive him. He tries to escape, but the old man holds him tightly. "What are you up to here?" he asks. Frantz confesses that he is in love. "I am not so bad as people say. Sit down and let us take a drink together and have a chat, " answers Coppelius. He gets an old flagon of wine and two goblets. He takes a sip with Frantz, and then, when Frantz is not looking, he throws away the wine.
Frantz finds that the wine has a peculiar taste. He tosses it down, however, and Coppelius makes him drink more and more. Frantz tries to get near the window where he has seen Coppelia. But his legs give way, he falls heavily on the bench and is asleep.
Coppelius gets a magic book and studies its pages. Then he rolls the pedestal which holds Coppelia, bringing it nearer to sleeping Frantz. Placing his hands over the heart and forehead of the young man, he tries to take away his soul to give life to the young girl. Coppelia rises up, she begins her mechanical motions but then she descends the first step of the pedestal and then the second. She walks! She lives!
Coppelius is almost beside himself with joy. His work has surpassed all that human hand has ever created! She soon begins to dance slowly, and than all at once darts off so quickly that Coppelius can scarcely follow her. She smiles; a color comes to her cheeks and she is full of life!
She sees the vial and places it to her lips. Coppelius is just in time to snatch the flagon from her hands. She perceives the magic book and asks Coppelius what it means. "There are impenetrable secrets, " he answers, and closes the book. She examines the automata. "I have made them all, " Coppelius says. She stops in front of Frantz. "And that one?" she asks. "It is like the rest, " he answers. She sees a dagger and pricks her own finger with the point of it and then amuses herself by thrusting it at the little Moor. Coppelius roars with laughter... but she approaches Frantz... The old man stops her and she turns against him and chases him around the studio. At last he disarms her. He throws a cloak over her shoulders, and it seems to awaken in her a world of new ideas. She dances a Spanish dance. Then she finds a Scotch scarf-pin and taking it in her hands, she dances a jig. She jumps and runs around, throwing everything within her reach to the ground and breaking it! She is decidedly too lively! What shall Coppelius do!
In the midst of all the noise, Frantz wakes up. Coppelius now seizes Coppelia and replacing her by main force on the pedestal, draws the curtains. He then goes up to Frantz and orders him to leave. "Go along!" he cries, "you are good for nothing."
Then he stops and listens. Did he not hear the tune which generally accompanies the movement of the automata? He jumps up and while he is staring at Coppelia, who has started her old movements, Swanilda skips out unobserved from behind the curtain. She sets the other two automata going. "Are these two also moving by themselves?" Coppelius exclaims. All at once he sees Swanilda disappearing with Frantz. He has a vague notion that some game has been played on him and falls heavily in the midst of the automata which keep moving as if to mock at their master s grief and despair.

Act III
A lawn in front of the baronial castle. At the back, the bell, the gift of the lord of the manor, is hung from poles, decorated with garlands and banners. A car covered with allegorical designs and on which are grouped the various actors for the fete, has just stopped in front of the bell.
The priests have pronounced a benediction over the bell. The betrothed couples who are to be given a dowry, and are to be united on this festal day go and bow before the baron. Frantz and Swanilda complete their mutual reconciliation. Frantz has disabused himself of his temporary infatuation and thinks no more of Coppelia. He knows what a joke has been played upon him. Swanilda forgives him and giving him her hand, advances with him before the lord of the manor.
All at once there is a stir among the crowd. Coppelius comes to implore and even to demand justice; they have ridiculed him and have broken everything in his house, his masterpieces made with the greatest labor and patience, have been smashed. Who is going to pay him? Swanilda, who has just received her dowry, quickly offers it to Coppelius. But the lord of the manor stops Swanilda. She may keep her dowry. He throws a purse to him and whilst Coppelius departs with his money, he gives the signal for the festivities to begin.
The Bell-ringer alights first from the car. He summons the Morning Hours. They appear, quickly followed by Aurora. The bell rings! It is the Hour of Prayer. Aurora vanishes, chased by the Hours of Day. These are the working hours, and the young girls and reapers begin their work. The bell rings again! It announces a wedding.
Derived from: Delibes Ballet of Coppelia. Paris Opera Libretto. Under the Direction of Mr. Heinrich Conried. The Original Italian, French or German Libretto with a Correct English Translation. New York : F. Rullman.

Video
Evening:      
Evening:   Un Ballo in Maschera (Opera by Giuseppe Verdi)   Performance information
Un Ballo in Maschera (Opera by Giuseppe Verdi) - Bolshoi Theatre

Opera in three acts
Giuseppe Verdi
Libretto by Antonio Somma based on the text by Augustin Eug?ne Scribe
Music Director: Giacomo Sagripanti
Director and Set Designer: Davide Livermore
Costume Designer: Mariana Fracasso
Lightning Designer: Antonio Castro
Chief Chorus Master: Valery Borisov
Video Design: D-wok
Will be premiered on April 20, 2018.

Evening:   Coppelia (Ballet by Leo Delibes)   Performance information
Coppelia (Ballet by Leo Delibes) - Bolshoi Theatre

Ballet in three acts
Libretto by Charles Nuitter and Arthur Saint-Leon after the stories by Ernst Theodore Amadeus Hoffmann
Choreography: Marius Petipa and Enrico Cecchetti
Revival and new choreographic version: Sergei Vikharev
Designer: Boris Kaminsky
Costume Designer: Tatiana Noginova
Music Director: Igor Dronov
Lighting Designer: Damir Ismagilov

SYNOPSIS

Act I
A public Square in a small town, on the borders of Galicia, with wooden houses painted with bright colors. One house stands out in contrast to the others, with grating before the windows and the door securely fastened. This is the residence of Coppelius.
Swanilda is approaching the house of Coppelius, raises her eyes to a large window, behind which Coppelia, the daughter of old Coppelius, is seen, sitting with a book in her hands apparently absorbed in her reading. Every morning she is seen at the same window and in the same attitude, and then disappears. She never goes out from this mysterious residence. She appears to be pretty, and many young men in the town have passed long hours beneath her window, beseeching for one look.
Swanilda suspects that her fiance, Frantz, is not indifferent to the beauty of Coppelia. She tries to attract her attention, but Coppelia has her eyes always fixed on her book, of which she does not even turn the leaves.
Swanilda cannot contain her feelings of anger. She starts to knock at the door, but she perceives Frantz approaching, and remains in hiding to see what he is going to do.
Frantz, who at first was going toward Swanilda house, suddenly stops. Coppelia is at the window. He bows to her. At the same time she turns her head and appears to return Frantz s salute. Frantz has scarcely time to throw a kiss to Coppelia before old Coppelius has opened his window, and seems to be amused at what has been going on.
Swanilda is furious against Coppelius and against Frantz. However, she remains quiet and pretends to have seen nothing. She runs after a butterfly. Frantz runs with her, and catching it, pins it in the collar of his coat. Swanilda reproaches him for his cruelty: "What has this poor insect done to you?" After many reproaches, the young maid brings herself to tell him, that she knows all. He has deceived her. He loves Coppelia. Frantz tries in vain to defend himself.
The Burgomaster announces that on the next day a grand fete will take place - the Lord of the manor has given a bell to the Town. They crowd round the Burgomaster. The noise is being made in Coppelius house. Odd looking lights are shining at the windows. Some of the girls shrink with fear from this mysterious abode. But it is nothing but the clash of the hammer on the anvil, and the light is the reflection from the forge. Coppelius is an old fool who is always working. At what? No one knows and who cares? He must be left alone and not be stopped from amusing himself. The Burgomaster approaches Swanilda. He tells her that tomorrow the lord of the manor will give a dowry and marriage to several couples. She is betrothed to Frantz; shall they not be united to-morrow? Ah! but there is time yet, and the young girl looking spitefully at Frantz, tells the Burgomaster that she will tell him a story. It is the story of a straw which reveals all secrets.
Swanilda takes the straw from a bundle, and placing it to her ear, pretends to listen; then she tells Frantz to listen also. Does it not tell him that he does not love Swanilda? Frantz answers that he hears nothing. Swanilda tries it with one of Frantz s friends, who pretends to hear very distinctly what the straw says. Frantz tries to protest, but Swanilda breaking the straw before his eyes, tells him that everything is broken between them. Frantz goes away, while Swanilda dances in the midst of her companions. Glasses are placed on the tables, and they drink the health of the lord of the manor and the Burgomaster.
Coppelius leaves his house and securely fastens the door. He has not gone many steps, before he is surrounded by a crowd of young fellows; some of whom want to take him away with them, while the others want to make him dance. The old man goes off swearing.
Swanilda is bidding adieu to her friends, when one of them sees a key, which Coppelius must have dropped.
The girls suggest to Swanilda to visit the mysterious house. At first Swanilda hesitates, but she wants to meet this rival. "Well, then, let us enter, " she says. The girls enter the house of Coppelius.
Frantz is seen coming up, carrying a ladder. He has determined to see what chance he has with Coppelia. The opportunity is most favorable and Coppelius is far off! But it is not so, for just as Frantz is steadying the ladder against the balcony, he sees Coppelius returning and looking for the lost key. He sees Frantz just about to climb the ladder. Frantz runs away.

Act II
A large room is full of all kinds of instruments and tools. There are several automata on pedestals. There are figures of an old man, dressed in Persian costume, a Negro in threatening attitude, a little Moorish cymbal-player, a Chinaman with a tympanon before him.
The girls cautiously enter Coppelius house. Who are those people standing still in the dark shadows? They are face to face with the strange figures which a moment before had so frightened them. Swanilda draws aside the heavy curtains. There she sees Coppelia seated with her book in her hand. Swanilda salutes the strange girl who remains motionless. She speaks to her, but gets no answer. She touches the young girl s arm and then starts back through fear. Can it be a living creature? She puts her hand to the heart, but it does not beat. This young lady is an automaton, and the handy-work of Coppelius! Swanilda doesn t worry herself any more about her rival, but looks forward to the fun of telling Frantz all about her discovery. The girls run laughing, around the studio. They have nothing to fear now.
One of them in passing by the Tympanon player, touches it by accident. It begins playing a tune. The girls are at first bewildered, but soon begin dancing. They then find the spring, which sets the little Moorish figure in motion.
Suddenly Coppelius returns in a furious rage. He draws together the curtains which conceal Coppelia; stops the automata and runs after the girls. They slip through his hands and disappear down the back stairs. Swanilda is hiding behind the curtains. She is caught! but no; crouching in a corner she remains unseen when Coppelius looks behind the curtain. He examines Coppelia and finds that no harm has been done. He breathes more freely.
But what is that noise? He sees the top of a ladder in the window and then Frantz appears. Coppelius does not show himself. Frantz is going toward the spot where he has seen Coppelia, when two stout hands seize him. Frantz nearly dead with fright, implores Coppelius to forgive him. He tries to escape, but the old man holds him tightly. "What are you up to here?" he asks. Frantz confesses that he is in love. "I am not so bad as people say. Sit down and let us take a drink together and have a chat, " answers Coppelius. He gets an old flagon of wine and two goblets. He takes a sip with Frantz, and then, when Frantz is not looking, he throws away the wine.
Frantz finds that the wine has a peculiar taste. He tosses it down, however, and Coppelius makes him drink more and more. Frantz tries to get near the window where he has seen Coppelia. But his legs give way, he falls heavily on the bench and is asleep.
Coppelius gets a magic book and studies its pages. Then he rolls the pedestal which holds Coppelia, bringing it nearer to sleeping Frantz. Placing his hands over the heart and forehead of the young man, he tries to take away his soul to give life to the young girl. Coppelia rises up, she begins her mechanical motions but then she descends the first step of the pedestal and then the second. She walks! She lives!
Coppelius is almost beside himself with joy. His work has surpassed all that human hand has ever created! She soon begins to dance slowly, and than all at once darts off so quickly that Coppelius can scarcely follow her. She smiles; a color comes to her cheeks and she is full of life!
She sees the vial and places it to her lips. Coppelius is just in time to snatch the flagon from her hands. She perceives the magic book and asks Coppelius what it means. "There are impenetrable secrets, " he answers, and closes the book. She examines the automata. "I have made them all, " Coppelius says. She stops in front of Frantz. "And that one?" she asks. "It is like the rest, " he answers. She sees a dagger and pricks her own finger with the point of it and then amuses herself by thrusting it at the little Moor. Coppelius roars with laughter... but she approaches Frantz... The old man stops her and she turns against him and chases him around the studio. At last he disarms her. He throws a cloak over her shoulders, and it seems to awaken in her a world of new ideas. She dances a Spanish dance. Then she finds a Scotch scarf-pin and taking it in her hands, she dances a jig. She jumps and runs around, throwing everything within her reach to the ground and breaking it! She is decidedly too lively! What shall Coppelius do!
In the midst of all the noise, Frantz wakes up. Coppelius now seizes Coppelia and replacing her by main force on the pedestal, draws the curtains. He then goes up to Frantz and orders him to leave. "Go along!" he cries, "you are good for nothing."
Then he stops and listens. Did he not hear the tune which generally accompanies the movement of the automata? He jumps up and while he is staring at Coppelia, who has started her old movements, Swanilda skips out unobserved from behind the curtain. She sets the other two automata going. "Are these two also moving by themselves?" Coppelius exclaims. All at once he sees Swanilda disappearing with Frantz. He has a vague notion that some game has been played on him and falls heavily in the midst of the automata which keep moving as if to mock at their master s grief and despair.

Act III
A lawn in front of the baronial castle. At the back, the bell, the gift of the lord of the manor, is hung from poles, decorated with garlands and banners. A car covered with allegorical designs and on which are grouped the various actors for the fete, has just stopped in front of the bell.
The priests have pronounced a benediction over the bell. The betrothed couples who are to be given a dowry, and are to be united on this festal day go and bow before the baron. Frantz and Swanilda complete their mutual reconciliation. Frantz has disabused himself of his temporary infatuation and thinks no more of Coppelia. He knows what a joke has been played upon him. Swanilda forgives him and giving him her hand, advances with him before the lord of the manor.
All at once there is a stir among the crowd. Coppelius comes to implore and even to demand justice; they have ridiculed him and have broken everything in his house, his masterpieces made with the greatest labor and patience, have been smashed. Who is going to pay him? Swanilda, who has just received her dowry, quickly offers it to Coppelius. But the lord of the manor stops Swanilda. She may keep her dowry. He throws a purse to him and whilst Coppelius departs with his money, he gives the signal for the festivities to begin.
The Bell-ringer alights first from the car. He summons the Morning Hours. They appear, quickly followed by Aurora. The bell rings! It is the Hour of Prayer. Aurora vanishes, chased by the Hours of Day. These are the working hours, and the young girls and reapers begin their work. The bell rings again! It announces a wedding.
Derived from: Delibes Ballet of Coppelia. Paris Opera Libretto. Under the Direction of Mr. Heinrich Conried. The Original Italian, French or German Libretto with a Correct English Translation. New York : F. Rullman.

Video
April 22, SU
Matinée:   Coppelia (Ballet by Leo Delibes)   Performance information
Coppelia (Ballet by Leo Delibes) - Bolshoi Theatre

Ballet in three acts
Libretto by Charles Nuitter and Arthur Saint-Leon after the stories by Ernst Theodore Amadeus Hoffmann
Choreography: Marius Petipa and Enrico Cecchetti
Revival and new choreographic version: Sergei Vikharev
Designer: Boris Kaminsky
Costume Designer: Tatiana Noginova
Music Director: Igor Dronov
Lighting Designer: Damir Ismagilov

SYNOPSIS

Act I
A public Square in a small town, on the borders of Galicia, with wooden houses painted with bright colors. One house stands out in contrast to the others, with grating before the windows and the door securely fastened. This is the residence of Coppelius.
Swanilda is approaching the house of Coppelius, raises her eyes to a large window, behind which Coppelia, the daughter of old Coppelius, is seen, sitting with a book in her hands apparently absorbed in her reading. Every morning she is seen at the same window and in the same attitude, and then disappears. She never goes out from this mysterious residence. She appears to be pretty, and many young men in the town have passed long hours beneath her window, beseeching for one look.
Swanilda suspects that her fiance, Frantz, is not indifferent to the beauty of Coppelia. She tries to attract her attention, but Coppelia has her eyes always fixed on her book, of which she does not even turn the leaves.
Swanilda cannot contain her feelings of anger. She starts to knock at the door, but she perceives Frantz approaching, and remains in hiding to see what he is going to do.
Frantz, who at first was going toward Swanilda house, suddenly stops. Coppelia is at the window. He bows to her. At the same time she turns her head and appears to return Frantz s salute. Frantz has scarcely time to throw a kiss to Coppelia before old Coppelius has opened his window, and seems to be amused at what has been going on.
Swanilda is furious against Coppelius and against Frantz. However, she remains quiet and pretends to have seen nothing. She runs after a butterfly. Frantz runs with her, and catching it, pins it in the collar of his coat. Swanilda reproaches him for his cruelty: "What has this poor insect done to you?" After many reproaches, the young maid brings herself to tell him, that she knows all. He has deceived her. He loves Coppelia. Frantz tries in vain to defend himself.
The Burgomaster announces that on the next day a grand fete will take place - the Lord of the manor has given a bell to the Town. They crowd round the Burgomaster. The noise is being made in Coppelius house. Odd looking lights are shining at the windows. Some of the girls shrink with fear from this mysterious abode. But it is nothing but the clash of the hammer on the anvil, and the light is the reflection from the forge. Coppelius is an old fool who is always working. At what? No one knows and who cares? He must be left alone and not be stopped from amusing himself. The Burgomaster approaches Swanilda. He tells her that tomorrow the lord of the manor will give a dowry and marriage to several couples. She is betrothed to Frantz; shall they not be united to-morrow? Ah! but there is time yet, and the young girl looking spitefully at Frantz, tells the Burgomaster that she will tell him a story. It is the story of a straw which reveals all secrets.
Swanilda takes the straw from a bundle, and placing it to her ear, pretends to listen; then she tells Frantz to listen also. Does it not tell him that he does not love Swanilda? Frantz answers that he hears nothing. Swanilda tries it with one of Frantz s friends, who pretends to hear very distinctly what the straw says. Frantz tries to protest, but Swanilda breaking the straw before his eyes, tells him that everything is broken between them. Frantz goes away, while Swanilda dances in the midst of her companions. Glasses are placed on the tables, and they drink the health of the lord of the manor and the Burgomaster.
Coppelius leaves his house and securely fastens the door. He has not gone many steps, before he is surrounded by a crowd of young fellows; some of whom want to take him away with them, while the others want to make him dance. The old man goes off swearing.
Swanilda is bidding adieu to her friends, when one of them sees a key, which Coppelius must have dropped.
The girls suggest to Swanilda to visit the mysterious house. At first Swanilda hesitates, but she wants to meet this rival. "Well, then, let us enter, " she says. The girls enter the house of Coppelius.
Frantz is seen coming up, carrying a ladder. He has determined to see what chance he has with Coppelia. The opportunity is most favorable and Coppelius is far off! But it is not so, for just as Frantz is steadying the ladder against the balcony, he sees Coppelius returning and looking for the lost key. He sees Frantz just about to climb the ladder. Frantz runs away.

Act II
A large room is full of all kinds of instruments and tools. There are several automata on pedestals. There are figures of an old man, dressed in Persian costume, a Negro in threatening attitude, a little Moorish cymbal-player, a Chinaman with a tympanon before him.
The girls cautiously enter Coppelius house. Who are those people standing still in the dark shadows? They are face to face with the strange figures which a moment before had so frightened them. Swanilda draws aside the heavy curtains. There she sees Coppelia seated with her book in her hand. Swanilda salutes the strange girl who remains motionless. She speaks to her, but gets no answer. She touches the young girl s arm and then starts back through fear. Can it be a living creature? She puts her hand to the heart, but it does not beat. This young lady is an automaton, and the handy-work of Coppelius! Swanilda doesn t worry herself any more about her rival, but looks forward to the fun of telling Frantz all about her discovery. The girls run laughing, around the studio. They have nothing to fear now.
One of them in passing by the Tympanon player, touches it by accident. It begins playing a tune. The girls are at first bewildered, but soon begin dancing. They then find the spring, which sets the little Moorish figure in motion.
Suddenly Coppelius returns in a furious rage. He draws together the curtains which conceal Coppelia; stops the automata and runs after the girls. They slip through his hands and disappear down the back stairs. Swanilda is hiding behind the curtains. She is caught! but no; crouching in a corner she remains unseen when Coppelius looks behind the curtain. He examines Coppelia and finds that no harm has been done. He breathes more freely.
But what is that noise? He sees the top of a ladder in the window and then Frantz appears. Coppelius does not show himself. Frantz is going toward the spot where he has seen Coppelia, when two stout hands seize him. Frantz nearly dead with fright, implores Coppelius to forgive him. He tries to escape, but the old man holds him tightly. "What are you up to here?" he asks. Frantz confesses that he is in love. "I am not so bad as people say. Sit down and let us take a drink together and have a chat, " answers Coppelius. He gets an old flagon of wine and two goblets. He takes a sip with Frantz, and then, when Frantz is not looking, he throws away the wine.
Frantz finds that the wine has a peculiar taste. He tosses it down, however, and Coppelius makes him drink more and more. Frantz tries to get near the window where he has seen Coppelia. But his legs give way, he falls heavily on the bench and is asleep.
Coppelius gets a magic book and studies its pages. Then he rolls the pedestal which holds Coppelia, bringing it nearer to sleeping Frantz. Placing his hands over the heart and forehead of the young man, he tries to take away his soul to give life to the young girl. Coppelia rises up, she begins her mechanical motions but then she descends the first step of the pedestal and then the second. She walks! She lives!
Coppelius is almost beside himself with joy. His work has surpassed all that human hand has ever created! She soon begins to dance slowly, and than all at once darts off so quickly that Coppelius can scarcely follow her. She smiles; a color comes to her cheeks and she is full of life!
She sees the vial and places it to her lips. Coppelius is just in time to snatch the flagon from her hands. She perceives the magic book and asks Coppelius what it means. "There are impenetrable secrets, " he answers, and closes the book. She examines the automata. "I have made them all, " Coppelius says. She stops in front of Frantz. "And that one?" she asks. "It is like the rest, " he answers. She sees a dagger and pricks her own finger with the point of it and then amuses herself by thrusting it at the little Moor. Coppelius roars with laughter... but she approaches Frantz... The old man stops her and she turns against him and chases him around the studio. At last he disarms her. He throws a cloak over her shoulders, and it seems to awaken in her a world of new ideas. She dances a Spanish dance. Then she finds a Scotch scarf-pin and taking it in her hands, she dances a jig. She jumps and runs around, throwing everything within her reach to the ground and breaking it! She is decidedly too lively! What shall Coppelius do!
In the midst of all the noise, Frantz wakes up. Coppelius now seizes Coppelia and replacing her by main force on the pedestal, draws the curtains. He then goes up to Frantz and orders him to leave. "Go along!" he cries, "you are good for nothing."
Then he stops and listens. Did he not hear the tune which generally accompanies the movement of the automata? He jumps up and while he is staring at Coppelia, who has started her old movements, Swanilda skips out unobserved from behind the curtain. She sets the other two automata going. "Are these two also moving by themselves?" Coppelius exclaims. All at once he sees Swanilda disappearing with Frantz. He has a vague notion that some game has been played on him and falls heavily in the midst of the automata which keep moving as if to mock at their master s grief and despair.

Act III
A lawn in front of the baronial castle. At the back, the bell, the gift of the lord of the manor, is hung from poles, decorated with garlands and banners. A car covered with allegorical designs and on which are grouped the various actors for the fete, has just stopped in front of the bell.
The priests have pronounced a benediction over the bell. The betrothed couples who are to be given a dowry, and are to be united on this festal day go and bow before the baron. Frantz and Swanilda complete their mutual reconciliation. Frantz has disabused himself of his temporary infatuation and thinks no more of Coppelia. He knows what a joke has been played upon him. Swanilda forgives him and giving him her hand, advances with him before the lord of the manor.
All at once there is a stir among the crowd. Coppelius comes to implore and even to demand justice; they have ridiculed him and have broken everything in his house, his masterpieces made with the greatest labor and patience, have been smashed. Who is going to pay him? Swanilda, who has just received her dowry, quickly offers it to Coppelius. But the lord of the manor stops Swanilda. She may keep her dowry. He throws a purse to him and whilst Coppelius departs with his money, he gives the signal for the festivities to begin.
The Bell-ringer alights first from the car. He summons the Morning Hours. They appear, quickly followed by Aurora. The bell rings! It is the Hour of Prayer. Aurora vanishes, chased by the Hours of Day. These are the working hours, and the young girls and reapers begin their work. The bell rings again! It announces a wedding.
Derived from: Delibes Ballet of Coppelia. Paris Opera Libretto. Under the Direction of Mr. Heinrich Conried. The Original Italian, French or German Libretto with a Correct English Translation. New York : F. Rullman.

Video
Evening:   Un Ballo in Maschera (Opera by Giuseppe Verdi)   Performance information
Un Ballo in Maschera (Opera by Giuseppe Verdi) - Bolshoi Theatre

Opera in three acts
Giuseppe Verdi
Libretto by Antonio Somma based on the text by Augustin Eug?ne Scribe
Music Director: Giacomo Sagripanti
Director and Set Designer: Davide Livermore
Costume Designer: Mariana Fracasso
Lightning Designer: Antonio Castro
Chief Chorus Master: Valery Borisov
Video Design: D-wok
Will be premiered on April 20, 2018.

April 24, TU
Evening:   Un Ballo in Maschera (Opera by Giuseppe Verdi)   Performance information
Un Ballo in Maschera (Opera by Giuseppe Verdi) - Bolshoi Theatre

Opera in three acts
Giuseppe Verdi
Libretto by Antonio Somma based on the text by Augustin Eug?ne Scribe
Music Director: Giacomo Sagripanti
Director and Set Designer: Davide Livermore
Costume Designer: Mariana Fracasso
Lightning Designer: Antonio Castro
Chief Chorus Master: Valery Borisov
Video Design: D-wok
Will be premiered on April 20, 2018.

April 25, WE
Evening:   A Play For Him. The Ballet Soloists Evening   Performance information
A Play For Him. The Ballet Soloists Evening - Bolshoi Theatre

Vyacheslav Lopatin, Denis Savin, Igor Tsvirko, Vladislav Kozlov
Choreography: Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui, Anton Pimonov, Andrei Kaidanovsky, Marijo and Pilar, Alvarez, Claudio Hoffmann

Benefit

A Play for Him is the benefit of the Bolshoi Ballet"s wonderful male dancers, who are quite unique in their own way. Principal dancer Vyacheslav Lopatin, leading soloists Denis Savin and Igor Tsvirko, artist of ballet Vladislav Kozlov will seize a rare opportunity to stay in the spotlight and represent a collective image of a modern male ballet dancer.

Throughout history, the ballet is a feminine art form, in which the ballerina is the star, supported by her male cavalier, who always remains in her shadow. No coincidence that many performances are named after the main heroines - Giselle, Paquita, Esmeralda, Raymonda, Carmen (Carmen Suite), Anna Carenina and so on... It"s highly unlikely Marius Petipa could have supported the idea of the male ballet dancers" benefit; and yet our artists got a chance to prove themselves in a new choreography and circumstances.

The program is composed of four parts. All of them will be shown for the first time in Russia, and two are the world premieres. Among the choreographers are acknowledged Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui, aspiring choreographers Andrei Kaydanovsky and Anton Pimonov, as well as the Argentine team, starring Pilar ?lvarez, Claudio Hoffmann, Marij? ?lvarez. All pieces will be performed in different dance styles from neoclassic to ... tango. All parts of A Play are of course about love, therefore are inconceivable without women, so our female dancers will perform together with the beneficiaries.

Evening:   Un Ballo in Maschera (Opera by Giuseppe Verdi)   Performance information
Un Ballo in Maschera (Opera by Giuseppe Verdi) - Bolshoi Theatre

Opera in three acts
Giuseppe Verdi
Libretto by Antonio Somma based on the text by Augustin Eug?ne Scribe
Music Director: Giacomo Sagripanti
Director and Set Designer: Davide Livermore
Costume Designer: Mariana Fracasso
Lightning Designer: Antonio Castro
Chief Chorus Master: Valery Borisov
Video Design: D-wok
Will be premiered on April 20, 2018.

April 26, TH
Evening:   A Play For Him. The Ballet Soloists Evening   Performance information
A Play For Him. The Ballet Soloists Evening - Bolshoi Theatre

Vyacheslav Lopatin, Denis Savin, Igor Tsvirko, Vladislav Kozlov
Choreography: Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui, Anton Pimonov, Andrei Kaidanovsky, Marijo and Pilar, Alvarez, Claudio Hoffmann

Benefit

A Play for Him is the benefit of the Bolshoi Ballet"s wonderful male dancers, who are quite unique in their own way. Principal dancer Vyacheslav Lopatin, leading soloists Denis Savin and Igor Tsvirko, artist of ballet Vladislav Kozlov will seize a rare opportunity to stay in the spotlight and represent a collective image of a modern male ballet dancer.

Throughout history, the ballet is a feminine art form, in which the ballerina is the star, supported by her male cavalier, who always remains in her shadow. No coincidence that many performances are named after the main heroines - Giselle, Paquita, Esmeralda, Raymonda, Carmen (Carmen Suite), Anna Carenina and so on... It"s highly unlikely Marius Petipa could have supported the idea of the male ballet dancers" benefit; and yet our artists got a chance to prove themselves in a new choreography and circumstances.

The program is composed of four parts. All of them will be shown for the first time in Russia, and two are the world premieres. Among the choreographers are acknowledged Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui, aspiring choreographers Andrei Kaydanovsky and Anton Pimonov, as well as the Argentine team, starring Pilar ?lvarez, Claudio Hoffmann, Marij? ?lvarez. All pieces will be performed in different dance styles from neoclassic to ... tango. All parts of A Play are of course about love, therefore are inconceivable without women, so our female dancers will perform together with the beneficiaries.

Evening:   Un Ballo in Maschera (Opera by Giuseppe Verdi)   Performance information
Un Ballo in Maschera (Opera by Giuseppe Verdi) - Bolshoi Theatre

Opera in three acts
Giuseppe Verdi
Libretto by Antonio Somma based on the text by Augustin Eug?ne Scribe
Music Director: Giacomo Sagripanti
Director and Set Designer: Davide Livermore
Costume Designer: Mariana Fracasso
Lightning Designer: Antonio Castro
Chief Chorus Master: Valery Borisov
Video Design: D-wok
Will be premiered on April 20, 2018.

April 28, SA
Matinée:   Iolanta (Symphonic suite Nutcracker is performed as part of production. Opera in two acts)   Performance information
Iolanta (Symphonic suite Nutcracker is performed as part of production. Opera in two acts) - Bolshoi Theatre

Pyotr Tchaikovsky
Symphonic Suite, Opera in one act
Libretto by Modest Tchaikovsky after "King Rene s Daughter" by Heinrich Hertz
Music Director: Vladimir Fedoseyev
Stage Director: Sergey Zhenovach
Designer: Alexander Borovsky
Lighting Designer: Damir Ismagilov
Chief Chorus Master: Valery Borisov
In commemoration of Tchaikovsky s 175th anniversary
Will be premiered on October 28, 2015.

Synopsis

Iolanta, the blind daughter of the King of Provence, is telling her nurse, Martha, that she is full of some unknown longing. Iolanta s friends, Brigitte and Laura, try to cheer her up by singing songs and bringing her flowers. Martha also tries to comfort Iolanta by singing her favorite lullaby. This sends Iolanta to sleep.

enter Almeric, King Rene s sword-bearer. He informs the castle porter, Bertrand, that very soon the King will be arriving with a famous Physician who, it is hoped, will cure Iolanta s blindness. The trumpets sound, announcing the arrival of the King. King Rene enters accompanied by the Moorish Physician, Ibn-Hakia. The King explains that Iolanta has been betrothed from infancy to Robert, Duke of Burgundy, and is soon to marry him, but the Duke does not know that his future wife is blind. Indeed, Iolanta herself is totally unaware of her misfortune. Iolanta has been brought up by her father in this remote castle. He surrounded her with loyal retainers and forbade them on pain of death to tell her the truth. Ibn-Hakia says that the only hope for Iolanta is to inform her of her disability and then, so long as she passionately wishes to recover her sight, she will do so. King Rene is full of doubts and fear for his daughter s future.

Robert, Duke of Burgundy, and his friend Count Vaudemont, appear. They are impressed to find a beautiful garden in such a wild, remote spot. They are, however, puzzled to see a notice which threatens with death anyone entering it without permission. Robert is downhearted for he is soon to be united in matrimony with some Iolanta whom he has never met, while his heart already belongs to another.

A girl appears on the terrace. Vaudemont is struck by her beauty. Hearing unfamiliar voices, the girl, who is in fact Iolanta, suggests to the strangers that they rest under the shade of the trees and hurries off to fetch them some wine. Robert does not trust the stranger and decides to leave. Vaudemont enchanted by Iolanta s beauty and stays behind. When Iolanta returns he tells her of the great impression she has made on him and asks her to pick him a red rose in memory of their meeting. Iolanta hands him a rose, but it is a white one. Vaudemont repeats his request and again he is given a white rose. He begins to suspect something is wrong with the girl. To make sure, he picks a bunch of roses and asks Iolanta to tell him how many flowers there are in the bunch. Iolanta explains that to count them she needs to touch each flower. Vaudemont realizes that Iolanta is blind and tells her so. He starts to describe to her the wonders of God s world which she is destined never to see, but Iolanta argues that eyesight is not necessary to appreciate the beauty of the world.

Voices are heard: the King enters, followed by Physician Ibn-Hakia and servants. Rene is horrified when he learns that Vaudemont has told Iolanta of her disability and finally suggests that she should try Ibn-Hakia s course of treatment. Iolanta remains indifferent to the idea which makes the Physician lose all hope. Noticing that Iolanta is very much taken by Vaudemont, King Rene tells Vaudemont that he will be executed unless his daughter recovers her sight. Iolanta then begs the Physician to cure her.

A fanfare of trumpets announces the arrival of the Duke of Burgundy who, with a group of armed knights, is hurrying to the rescue of his friend. Robert is amazed to see King Rene. Vaudemont confesses to Robert that he is in love with Iolanta, the latter s betrothed, and asks him to tell the King that he, Robert, has given his heart to someone else. Rene consents to the marriage of Iolanta and Count Vaudemont. Shouts of joy are heard, and Iolanta, who has recovered her sight, appears at the castle door. Overjoyed, King Rene hurries to embrace his daughter and then leads Vaudemont up to her. everyone gives passionate thanks to God for her recovery.

Video
Evening:   Iolanta (Symphonic suite Nutcracker is performed as part of production. Opera in two acts)   Performance information
Iolanta (Symphonic suite Nutcracker is performed as part of production. Opera in two acts) - Bolshoi Theatre

Pyotr Tchaikovsky
Symphonic Suite, Opera in one act
Libretto by Modest Tchaikovsky after "King Rene s Daughter" by Heinrich Hertz
Music Director: Vladimir Fedoseyev
Stage Director: Sergey Zhenovach
Designer: Alexander Borovsky
Lighting Designer: Damir Ismagilov
Chief Chorus Master: Valery Borisov
In commemoration of Tchaikovsky s 175th anniversary
Will be premiered on October 28, 2015.

Synopsis

Iolanta, the blind daughter of the King of Provence, is telling her nurse, Martha, that she is full of some unknown longing. Iolanta s friends, Brigitte and Laura, try to cheer her up by singing songs and bringing her flowers. Martha also tries to comfort Iolanta by singing her favorite lullaby. This sends Iolanta to sleep.

enter Almeric, King Rene s sword-bearer. He informs the castle porter, Bertrand, that very soon the King will be arriving with a famous Physician who, it is hoped, will cure Iolanta s blindness. The trumpets sound, announcing the arrival of the King. King Rene enters accompanied by the Moorish Physician, Ibn-Hakia. The King explains that Iolanta has been betrothed from infancy to Robert, Duke of Burgundy, and is soon to marry him, but the Duke does not know that his future wife is blind. Indeed, Iolanta herself is totally unaware of her misfortune. Iolanta has been brought up by her father in this remote castle. He surrounded her with loyal retainers and forbade them on pain of death to tell her the truth. Ibn-Hakia says that the only hope for Iolanta is to inform her of her disability and then, so long as she passionately wishes to recover her sight, she will do so. King Rene is full of doubts and fear for his daughter s future.

Robert, Duke of Burgundy, and his friend Count Vaudemont, appear. They are impressed to find a beautiful garden in such a wild, remote spot. They are, however, puzzled to see a notice which threatens with death anyone entering it without permission. Robert is downhearted for he is soon to be united in matrimony with some Iolanta whom he has never met, while his heart already belongs to another.

A girl appears on the terrace. Vaudemont is struck by her beauty. Hearing unfamiliar voices, the girl, who is in fact Iolanta, suggests to the strangers that they rest under the shade of the trees and hurries off to fetch them some wine. Robert does not trust the stranger and decides to leave. Vaudemont enchanted by Iolanta s beauty and stays behind. When Iolanta returns he tells her of the great impression she has made on him and asks her to pick him a red rose in memory of their meeting. Iolanta hands him a rose, but it is a white one. Vaudemont repeats his request and again he is given a white rose. He begins to suspect something is wrong with the girl. To make sure, he picks a bunch of roses and asks Iolanta to tell him how many flowers there are in the bunch. Iolanta explains that to count them she needs to touch each flower. Vaudemont realizes that Iolanta is blind and tells her so. He starts to describe to her the wonders of God s world which she is destined never to see, but Iolanta argues that eyesight is not necessary to appreciate the beauty of the world.

Voices are heard: the King enters, followed by Physician Ibn-Hakia and servants. Rene is horrified when he learns that Vaudemont has told Iolanta of her disability and finally suggests that she should try Ibn-Hakia s course of treatment. Iolanta remains indifferent to the idea which makes the Physician lose all hope. Noticing that Iolanta is very much taken by Vaudemont, King Rene tells Vaudemont that he will be executed unless his daughter recovers her sight. Iolanta then begs the Physician to cure her.

A fanfare of trumpets announces the arrival of the Duke of Burgundy who, with a group of armed knights, is hurrying to the rescue of his friend. Robert is amazed to see King Rene. Vaudemont confesses to Robert that he is in love with Iolanta, the latter s betrothed, and asks him to tell the King that he, Robert, has given his heart to someone else. Rene consents to the marriage of Iolanta and Count Vaudemont. Shouts of joy are heard, and Iolanta, who has recovered her sight, appears at the castle door. Overjoyed, King Rene hurries to embrace his daughter and then leads Vaudemont up to her. everyone gives passionate thanks to God for her recovery.

Video
Evening:   La Bayadere (Ballet by Ludvig Minkus)   Performance information
La Bayadere (Ballet by Ludvig Minkus) - Bolshoi Theatre

Ballet in three acts.
Libretto by Marius Petipa and Sergei Khudekov
Choreography: Marius Petipa
New scenic version: Yuri Grigorovich
Scenes from productions by Vakhtang Chabukiani, Nikolai Zubkovsky, Konstantin Sergeyev used
Sets and costumes after sketches by designers of the first production (1877) revived by Valery Firsov,
Nikolai Sharonov (sets) and Nikolai Sviridchikov (costumes)
Supervisor of scenery and costumes revival: Valery Levental
Music Director: Alexander Kopylov

SYNOPSIS

Act I
Young warriors led by Solor are hunting a tiger. Before entering the forest Solor asks a fakir, named Magedavia, to tell Nikia, a bayadere, that he will wait for her near the temple.
The High Brahmin and priests are solemnly leaving the temple. The feast of worshipping fire begins. Fakirs and votaries of the temple, bayaderes, are performing sacred dances. Beautiful Nikia is among them. She adorns the festival.
Having forgotten about his ordination and vow of celibacy, the High Brahmin tells Nikia that he loves her and promises to place at her feet all the riches of India. Nikia rejects his wooing. She will never love him.
Nikia and other bayaderes give the fakirs water from the sacred pool. Imperceptibly Magedavia tells Nikia that Solor will come to see her. The bayadere is happy.
It is getting dark. Nikia comes to meet her beloved. Their secret rendezvous is guarded by the fakir. But the High Brahmin manages to overhear the conversation of the sweethearts.
Solor proposes that they elope. The bayadere agrees, but first she wants him to vow fidelity to her at the sacred fire. Solor takes the oath. The High Brahmin is infuriated. He appeals to the gods and demands punishment. His revenge will be terrible.
Next morning the rajah Dugmanta, head of the principality, tells his daughter Gamzatti that she will see her fiance that day.
The rajah sends for the fiance. It is the brave warrior Solor. The rajah shows Solor his beautiful daughter and proclaims them bride and groom. The warrior is struck by Gamzatti s beauty. But he remembers the bayadere, his vow to her, and is thrown into confusion.
It is time to hold the ceremony of consecrating Gamzatti's betrothal. Nikia is invited to the palace for the ceremony.
The High Brahmin arrives. He wants to tell the rajah a secret. Dugmanta sends everybody away. Gamzatti feels that the High Brahmin s arrival is somehow connected with her forthcoming marriage and eavesdrops on the Brahmin s conversation with her father.
The High Brahmin tells the rajah about Solor s love for Nikia. Dugmanta is infuriated but doesn t change his mind to give his daughter in marriage to Solor. The bayadere, who made Solor take the oath, must die.The High Brahmin who had wanted to get rid of his rival, didn t expect such a turn of events.
He threatens the rajah with punishment of the Gods for the bayadere s death. But the rajah is unrelenting.
Gamzatti orders her slave to bring Nikia. She sees that the bayadere is very beautiful and can be a dangerous rival. The rajah s daughter tells the bayadere about her forthcoming marriage and invites her to dance at the feast. She deliberately shows her the portrait of her fiance Solor. Nikia protests: Solor loves only her and he made a vow of eternal fidelity. The rajah s daughter demands that Nikia should give up Solor. But the bayadere would rather die than part with Solor. Gamzatti offers her jewels. Nikia throws them away with scorn. Nothing will make her part with her beloved. She raises her dagger in a rage. The slave stops her. But Gamzatti will never give her fiance back.

Act II
A sumptuous feast is being held on the occasion of Solor and Gamzatti s engagement. The bayadere Nikia is supposed to entertain the guests with dances. She can t hide her grief. Her eyes are fixed on her beloved Solor.
The fakir presents Nikia with a basket of flowers on behalf of Solor. The bayadere s dance is filled with happiness. But suddenly a snake crawls out of the flowers and bites her fatally.
Nikia realizes that the rajah s daughter is to blame for her death. The High Brahmin promises to save her life if she will love him. But the bayadere is faithful to her love for Solor. Nikia dies. Solor leaves the feast in despair.

Act III
Solor is inconsolable. He is gnawed by remorse. He enjoins the fakir to distract him from his grievous thoughts. Fascinated by the sacred dance, Solor sinks into the world of dreams.
Shadows appear to him out of the darkness. They are descending from mountains in a long file. Solor sees fair Nikia among them...
Solor comes out of his dazed state and hurries to the temple. He prays to the gods to forgive him. But it s too late. The infuriated gods punish Solor for his betrayal of love. Lightning and thunder destroy the temple. There is no more reality for Solor. He follows the shadow of fair Nikia...

Video
April 29, SU
Evening:   Iolanta (Symphonic suite Nutcracker is performed as part of production. Opera in two acts)   Performance information
Iolanta (Symphonic suite Nutcracker is performed as part of production. Opera in two acts) - Bolshoi Theatre

Pyotr Tchaikovsky
Symphonic Suite, Opera in one act
Libretto by Modest Tchaikovsky after "King Rene s Daughter" by Heinrich Hertz
Music Director: Vladimir Fedoseyev
Stage Director: Sergey Zhenovach
Designer: Alexander Borovsky
Lighting Designer: Damir Ismagilov
Chief Chorus Master: Valery Borisov
In commemoration of Tchaikovsky s 175th anniversary
Will be premiered on October 28, 2015.

Synopsis

Iolanta, the blind daughter of the King of Provence, is telling her nurse, Martha, that she is full of some unknown longing. Iolanta s friends, Brigitte and Laura, try to cheer her up by singing songs and bringing her flowers. Martha also tries to comfort Iolanta by singing her favorite lullaby. This sends Iolanta to sleep.

enter Almeric, King Rene s sword-bearer. He informs the castle porter, Bertrand, that very soon the King will be arriving with a famous Physician who, it is hoped, will cure Iolanta s blindness. The trumpets sound, announcing the arrival of the King. King Rene enters accompanied by the Moorish Physician, Ibn-Hakia. The King explains that Iolanta has been betrothed from infancy to Robert, Duke of Burgundy, and is soon to marry him, but the Duke does not know that his future wife is blind. Indeed, Iolanta herself is totally unaware of her misfortune. Iolanta has been brought up by her father in this remote castle. He surrounded her with loyal retainers and forbade them on pain of death to tell her the truth. Ibn-Hakia says that the only hope for Iolanta is to inform her of her disability and then, so long as she passionately wishes to recover her sight, she will do so. King Rene is full of doubts and fear for his daughter s future.

Robert, Duke of Burgundy, and his friend Count Vaudemont, appear. They are impressed to find a beautiful garden in such a wild, remote spot. They are, however, puzzled to see a notice which threatens with death anyone entering it without permission. Robert is downhearted for he is soon to be united in matrimony with some Iolanta whom he has never met, while his heart already belongs to another.

A girl appears on the terrace. Vaudemont is struck by her beauty. Hearing unfamiliar voices, the girl, who is in fact Iolanta, suggests to the strangers that they rest under the shade of the trees and hurries off to fetch them some wine. Robert does not trust the stranger and decides to leave. Vaudemont enchanted by Iolanta s beauty and stays behind. When Iolanta returns he tells her of the great impression she has made on him and asks her to pick him a red rose in memory of their meeting. Iolanta hands him a rose, but it is a white one. Vaudemont repeats his request and again he is given a white rose. He begins to suspect something is wrong with the girl. To make sure, he picks a bunch of roses and asks Iolanta to tell him how many flowers there are in the bunch. Iolanta explains that to count them she needs to touch each flower. Vaudemont realizes that Iolanta is blind and tells her so. He starts to describe to her the wonders of God s world which she is destined never to see, but Iolanta argues that eyesight is not necessary to appreciate the beauty of the world.

Voices are heard: the King enters, followed by Physician Ibn-Hakia and servants. Rene is horrified when he learns that Vaudemont has told Iolanta of her disability and finally suggests that she should try Ibn-Hakia s course of treatment. Iolanta remains indifferent to the idea which makes the Physician lose all hope. Noticing that Iolanta is very much taken by Vaudemont, King Rene tells Vaudemont that he will be executed unless his daughter recovers her sight. Iolanta then begs the Physician to cure her.

A fanfare of trumpets announces the arrival of the Duke of Burgundy who, with a group of armed knights, is hurrying to the rescue of his friend. Robert is amazed to see King Rene. Vaudemont confesses to Robert that he is in love with Iolanta, the latter s betrothed, and asks him to tell the King that he, Robert, has given his heart to someone else. Rene consents to the marriage of Iolanta and Count Vaudemont. Shouts of joy are heard, and Iolanta, who has recovered her sight, appears at the castle door. Overjoyed, King Rene hurries to embrace his daughter and then leads Vaudemont up to her. everyone gives passionate thanks to God for her recovery.

Video
Evening:   La Bayadere (Ballet by Ludvig Minkus)   Performance information
La Bayadere (Ballet by Ludvig Minkus) - Bolshoi Theatre

Ballet in three acts.
Libretto by Marius Petipa and Sergei Khudekov
Choreography: Marius Petipa
New scenic version: Yuri Grigorovich
Scenes from productions by Vakhtang Chabukiani, Nikolai Zubkovsky, Konstantin Sergeyev used
Sets and costumes after sketches by designers of the first production (1877) revived by Valery Firsov,
Nikolai Sharonov (sets) and Nikolai Sviridchikov (costumes)
Supervisor of scenery and costumes revival: Valery Levental
Music Director: Alexander Kopylov

SYNOPSIS

Act I
Young warriors led by Solor are hunting a tiger. Before entering the forest Solor asks a fakir, named Magedavia, to tell Nikia, a bayadere, that he will wait for her near the temple.
The High Brahmin and priests are solemnly leaving the temple. The feast of worshipping fire begins. Fakirs and votaries of the temple, bayaderes, are performing sacred dances. Beautiful Nikia is among them. She adorns the festival.
Having forgotten about his ordination and vow of celibacy, the High Brahmin tells Nikia that he loves her and promises to place at her feet all the riches of India. Nikia rejects his wooing. She will never love him.
Nikia and other bayaderes give the fakirs water from the sacred pool. Imperceptibly Magedavia tells Nikia that Solor will come to see her. The bayadere is happy.
It is getting dark. Nikia comes to meet her beloved. Their secret rendezvous is guarded by the fakir. But the High Brahmin manages to overhear the conversation of the sweethearts.
Solor proposes that they elope. The bayadere agrees, but first she wants him to vow fidelity to her at the sacred fire. Solor takes the oath. The High Brahmin is infuriated. He appeals to the gods and demands punishment. His revenge will be terrible.
Next morning the rajah Dugmanta, head of the principality, tells his daughter Gamzatti that she will see her fiance that day.
The rajah sends for the fiance. It is the brave warrior Solor. The rajah shows Solor his beautiful daughter and proclaims them bride and groom. The warrior is struck by Gamzatti s beauty. But he remembers the bayadere, his vow to her, and is thrown into confusion.
It is time to hold the ceremony of consecrating Gamzatti's betrothal. Nikia is invited to the palace for the ceremony.
The High Brahmin arrives. He wants to tell the rajah a secret. Dugmanta sends everybody away. Gamzatti feels that the High Brahmin s arrival is somehow connected with her forthcoming marriage and eavesdrops on the Brahmin s conversation with her father.
The High Brahmin tells the rajah about Solor s love for Nikia. Dugmanta is infuriated but doesn t change his mind to give his daughter in marriage to Solor. The bayadere, who made Solor take the oath, must die.The High Brahmin who had wanted to get rid of his rival, didn t expect such a turn of events.
He threatens the rajah with punishment of the Gods for the bayadere s death. But the rajah is unrelenting.
Gamzatti orders her slave to bring Nikia. She sees that the bayadere is very beautiful and can be a dangerous rival. The rajah s daughter tells the bayadere about her forthcoming marriage and invites her to dance at the feast. She deliberately shows her the portrait of her fiance Solor. Nikia protests: Solor loves only her and he made a vow of eternal fidelity. The rajah s daughter demands that Nikia should give up Solor. But the bayadere would rather die than part with Solor. Gamzatti offers her jewels. Nikia throws them away with scorn. Nothing will make her part with her beloved. She raises her dagger in a rage. The slave stops her. But Gamzatti will never give her fiance back.

Act II
A sumptuous feast is being held on the occasion of Solor and Gamzatti s engagement. The bayadere Nikia is supposed to entertain the guests with dances. She can t hide her grief. Her eyes are fixed on her beloved Solor.
The fakir presents Nikia with a basket of flowers on behalf of Solor. The bayadere s dance is filled with happiness. But suddenly a snake crawls out of the flowers and bites her fatally.
Nikia realizes that the rajah s daughter is to blame for her death. The High Brahmin promises to save her life if she will love him. But the bayadere is faithful to her love for Solor. Nikia dies. Solor leaves the feast in despair.

Act III
Solor is inconsolable. He is gnawed by remorse. He enjoins the fakir to distract him from his grievous thoughts. Fascinated by the sacred dance, Solor sinks into the world of dreams.
Shadows appear to him out of the darkness. They are descending from mountains in a long file. Solor sees fair Nikia among them...
Solor comes out of his dazed state and hurries to the temple. He prays to the gods to forgive him. But it s too late. The infuriated gods punish Solor for his betrayal of love. Lightning and thunder destroy the temple. There is no more reality for Solor. He follows the shadow of fair Nikia...

Video
April 30, MO
Evening:   La Bayadere (Ballet by Ludvig Minkus)   Performance information
La Bayadere (Ballet by Ludvig Minkus) - Bolshoi Theatre

Ballet in three acts.
Libretto by Marius Petipa and Sergei Khudekov
Choreography: Marius Petipa
New scenic version: Yuri Grigorovich
Scenes from productions by Vakhtang Chabukiani, Nikolai Zubkovsky, Konstantin Sergeyev used
Sets and costumes after sketches by designers of the first production (1877) revived by Valery Firsov,
Nikolai Sharonov (sets) and Nikolai Sviridchikov (costumes)
Supervisor of scenery and costumes revival: Valery Levental
Music Director: Alexander Kopylov

SYNOPSIS

Act I
Young warriors led by Solor are hunting a tiger. Before entering the forest Solor asks a fakir, named Magedavia, to tell Nikia, a bayadere, that he will wait for her near the temple.
The High Brahmin and priests are solemnly leaving the temple. The feast of worshipping fire begins. Fakirs and votaries of the temple, bayaderes, are performing sacred dances. Beautiful Nikia is among them. She adorns the festival.
Having forgotten about his ordination and vow of celibacy, the High Brahmin tells Nikia that he loves her and promises to place at her feet all the riches of India. Nikia rejects his wooing. She will never love him.
Nikia and other bayaderes give the fakirs water from the sacred pool. Imperceptibly Magedavia tells Nikia that Solor will come to see her. The bayadere is happy.
It is getting dark. Nikia comes to meet her beloved. Their secret rendezvous is guarded by the fakir. But the High Brahmin manages to overhear the conversation of the sweethearts.
Solor proposes that they elope. The bayadere agrees, but first she wants him to vow fidelity to her at the sacred fire. Solor takes the oath. The High Brahmin is infuriated. He appeals to the gods and demands punishment. His revenge will be terrible.
Next morning the rajah Dugmanta, head of the principality, tells his daughter Gamzatti that she will see her fiance that day.
The rajah sends for the fiance. It is the brave warrior Solor. The rajah shows Solor his beautiful daughter and proclaims them bride and groom. The warrior is struck by Gamzatti s beauty. But he remembers the bayadere, his vow to her, and is thrown into confusion.
It is time to hold the ceremony of consecrating Gamzatti's betrothal. Nikia is invited to the palace for the ceremony.
The High Brahmin arrives. He wants to tell the rajah a secret. Dugmanta sends everybody away. Gamzatti feels that the High Brahmin s arrival is somehow connected with her forthcoming marriage and eavesdrops on the Brahmin s conversation with her father.
The High Brahmin tells the rajah about Solor s love for Nikia. Dugmanta is infuriated but doesn t change his mind to give his daughter in marriage to Solor. The bayadere, who made Solor take the oath, must die.The High Brahmin who had wanted to get rid of his rival, didn t expect such a turn of events.
He threatens the rajah with punishment of the Gods for the bayadere s death. But the rajah is unrelenting.
Gamzatti orders her slave to bring Nikia. She sees that the bayadere is very beautiful and can be a dangerous rival. The rajah s daughter tells the bayadere about her forthcoming marriage and invites her to dance at the feast. She deliberately shows her the portrait of her fiance Solor. Nikia protests: Solor loves only her and he made a vow of eternal fidelity. The rajah s daughter demands that Nikia should give up Solor. But the bayadere would rather die than part with Solor. Gamzatti offers her jewels. Nikia throws them away with scorn. Nothing will make her part with her beloved. She raises her dagger in a rage. The slave stops her. But Gamzatti will never give her fiance back.

Act II
A sumptuous feast is being held on the occasion of Solor and Gamzatti s engagement. The bayadere Nikia is supposed to entertain the guests with dances. She can t hide her grief. Her eyes are fixed on her beloved Solor.
The fakir presents Nikia with a basket of flowers on behalf of Solor. The bayadere s dance is filled with happiness. But suddenly a snake crawls out of the flowers and bites her fatally.
Nikia realizes that the rajah s daughter is to blame for her death. The High Brahmin promises to save her life if she will love him. But the bayadere is faithful to her love for Solor. Nikia dies. Solor leaves the feast in despair.

Act III
Solor is inconsolable. He is gnawed by remorse. He enjoins the fakir to distract him from his grievous thoughts. Fascinated by the sacred dance, Solor sinks into the world of dreams.
Shadows appear to him out of the darkness. They are descending from mountains in a long file. Solor sees fair Nikia among them...
Solor comes out of his dazed state and hurries to the temple. He prays to the gods to forgive him. But it s too late. The infuriated gods punish Solor for his betrayal of love. Lightning and thunder destroy the temple. There is no more reality for Solor. He follows the shadow of fair Nikia...

Video


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